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Istituto di scienza dell'alimentazione

Torna all'elenco Contributi in rivista anno 2018

Contributo in rivista

Tipo: Articolo in rivista

Titolo: Prospective associations between social vulnerabilities and children's weight status. Results from the IDEFICS study.

Anno di pubblicazione: 2018

Autori: Iguacel I, Fernández-Alvira JM, Ahrens W, Bammann K, Gwozdz W, Lissner L, Michels N, Reisch L, Russo P, Szommer A, Tornaritis M, Veidebaum T, Börnhorst C, Moreno LA; IDEFICS consortium.

Affiliazioni autori: GENUD (Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development) Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Zaragoza, Edificio del SAI, C/Pedro Cerbuna s/n, 50009, Zaragoza, Spain. iguacel@unizar.es. 2 Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Zaragoza, Spain. iguacel@unizar.es. 3 Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón), Zaragoza, Spain. iguacel@unizar.es. 4 Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERObn), Zaragoza, Spain. iguacel@unizar.es. 5 GENUD (Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development) Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Zaragoza, Edificio del SAI, C/Pedro Cerbuna s/n, 50009, Zaragoza, Spain. 6 Fundación Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III (CNIC), Madrid, Spain. 7 Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology-BIPS, Bremen, Germany. 8 Institute of Statistics, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany. 9 Institute for Public Health and Nursing Sciences (IPP), University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany. 10 Copenhagen Business School, Copenhagen, Denmark. 11 Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine (EPSO), Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. 12 Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium. 13 Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council, Avellino, Italy. 14 Department of Paediatrics, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary. 15 Research and Education Institute of Child Health, Strovolos, Cyprus. 16 Department of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia. 17 Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Zaragoza, Spain. 18 Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón), Zaragoza, Spain. 19 Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERObn), Zaragoza, Spain.

Autori CNR:

  • PAOLA RUSSO

Lingua: inglese

Abstract: BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: In high-income countries, childhood obesity follows a clear socioeconomic gradient with greater prevalence in children with lower socioeconomic status (SES). The extent to which the trend of other social vulnerabilities over time and the accumulation of these vulnerabilities can affect children's weight is still unknown. SUBJECTS/METHODS: In the IDEFICS study, 8624 children aged 2.0-9.9 years from eight European countries were examined at baseline and after 2 years. Sociodemographic variables, maternal body mass index (BMI), and lifestyle were reported by parents. Children were measured and classified as thin, normal weight, and overweight/obese using the extended IOTF criteria. Four vulnerable groups were defined: children whose parents were migrants, children whose parents lack a social network, children from non-traditional families (children not living with both biological parents), and children with unemployed parents. Logistic mixed-effects models were used to study the association between vulnerabilities and children's weight at baseline and follow-up, temporal trends in vulnerabilities and children's weight and accumulation of vulnerabilities and children's weight. Models were adjusted for lifestyle, maternal BMI, parental education, and income. RESULTS: Children whose parents lost their social support at follow-up were more likely to be thin than non-vulnerable children (OR = 1.69, 99% CI = 1.03-2.78). Children whose parents had a migrant background (OR = 1.30, 99% CI 1.04-1.62), children from non-traditional families at both time points (OR = 1.40, 99% CI 1.03-1.90) and whose parents were unemployed at baseline and follow-up (OR = 2.03, 99% CI 1.03-3.99) were more likely to be overweight/obese compared to non-vulnerable children. Cross-sectionally, we did not find an association between parental lack of network, non-traditional family structure, or employment and children's weight status. CONCLUSIONS: Policy actions are required to tackle inadequate weight loss and gain among vulnerable children (especially those exposed over the long term) since they are at a higher risk of thinness and overweight.

Lingua abstract: inglese

Pagine totali: 13

Rivista:

International journal of obesity Macmillan, Nature Publishing
Paese di pubblicazione: Regno Unito
Lingua: inglese
ISSN: 0307-0565

DOI: 10.1038/s41366-018-0199-6

Referee: Sě: Internazionale

Stato della pubblicazione: Published version

Parole chiave:

  • children
  • body mass index
  • social vulnerabilities
  • IDEFICS

URL: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41366-018-0199-6

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